When Everything Changes in Seconds: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) + Initial Recovery

One decision, one slip in judgment and everything can change in seconds….

I want to use this post to discuss my accident along with the initial protocol I implemented as a result. My goal is to show those that have suffered you are not alone and for those who may suffer in the future hopefully offer some hope and guidance that there is a lot you can do to help. However, it is important to not get caught up stressing around doing everything but to do what you can because at the end of the day the most important thing is to be stress-free and rest and remember we are all different

Why Bintan 70.3 Ironman?

At the beginning of this year, I set two pretty ambitious goals, targeting World Championship qualification in both Half and full distance Ironman, something I previously never perceived as possible.

In my pursuit to attain an early qualification for 2020 Taupo 70.3 World Championships, I flew over to Bintan, Indonesia to race a Half Ironman. Everything was going perfectly to plan with a solid swim and on target for an awesome bike on a very challenging technical & hilly course, I was racing my perfect race, feeling great with everything going to plan, in fact, if I kept tracking as I was I would have won my Age Group (I needed a podium to guarantee my qualification spot) and also came in the top 5 overall. However, this was not meant to be as at the 75km mark of the bike everything went blank….

I couldn’t tell you what happened first hand because I have no recollection but from what I was told, I came flying around the corner towards two speed bumps, the first I bunny hopped and then hit the second of the two with my front wheel off-centre (according to my Garmin Computer at 42kms) sending me flying over my handlebars headfirst into a curb, with my right side taking most the impact/ road rash but I must have rolled as well because I was cut up on my left as well. I am not sure how long I was out for but I don’t recall anything from my time at the crash site but apparently, I was repeatedly asking the same questions over and over “what happened??” “Is my bike ok??” Once told I would ask the same question straight away again. Not surprisingly the volunteer that was helping me knew I was not in a good place so he called in the doctor to assess me, you would think at this point my race was over but the doctor said if I want to keep going I can and those who know me I am extremely stubborn and a sucker for a challenge so there was no choice in my head (not that it was working anyway) I assume, this is when I jumped straight back on my bike and went on autopilot. This is the part that really scares me because I still have no memory of any of this, I am not sure why the doctor let me go, maybe it was because I was being difficult wanting to jump back on my bike and not listening (I wouldn’t be surprised, I put a lot into the prep of this race) but he should have never given me the option in the state I was in, he should have pulled me from the race. The volunteer that helped me at the time of the accident found me after the race and filled me on all of this he couldn’t believe the doctor let me back on the bike, he also could believe I had finished the whole race.

With no one stopping me there was no way I wasn’t getting back on my bike. Dazed and confused it wasn’t until after the race I looked back to my Garmin Computer for answers and they truly shocked me! Turns out I spent 17mins at the crash site…… No clue how much of that I was unconscious or what was going on and then back onto the bike on autopilot with 15kms left of the 90km bike course. Still with no memory of this, I wonder what was going through my mind because this was quite possibly the stupidest thing I could have ever done, not just because I was back on the bike but the speeds I was going with an extremely beaten up mind, body and bike (Bike had $3700 worth of damage….). My Garmin once again highlighted my stupidity although overall last 15km was slower than it would have been it showed multiple times where I exceeded 60km/hr and if you know anything about concussions the absolute worst thing you can do is have another in close concession… Even within up to 3 weeks. Thankfully I survived this very silly decision.

In to transition and onto the 21km run, this is where I somewhat came to. Dazed and confused and with no memory of losing 17min at the crash site or my slow last 15km, I did my best to keep my mind on what I came here for a podium finish to qualify. Again not a smart move in hot humid 35-38 degree conditions and with a whole host of injuries and road rash that I never took the time to assess my situation. It didn’t take long until I turned my Garmin off the speed setting because I wasn’t even close to my target pace and I just focused on getting to finish as fast as possible. This was not easy as I had also pulled my right calf in the crash so I felt each and every step.

Long story short, I got through the hottest run of my life (thank god for all the sponges) and pretty much collapsed across the line and mumbled the words “medical, I need medical” I was in an absolute state, I could no longer stand and had to be helped and lost all control of my body (even my bladder….) even sitting wasn’t possible. I spent the next 3-4hrs or so getting checked and monitored in the medical tent trying to figure out the extent of everything.

Everything seemed to come somewhat better and was I able to hold a conversation but it wasn’t until I got back to my accommodation (maybe due to all the movement?) things really hit me and went downhill. Travelling alone this can be scary but thankfully I was surrounded by a really nice Italian man, who had also raced and some really helpful resort staff. Although none of their English was great I managed to get my message across (google translate was our best friend). I got them to monitor me every couple of hours and then made the decision if I was not better by 9 pm I would go to the hospital. Reluctant as being on isolated island I can’t imagine they had assessment tools like MRI that I would need to assess a brain bleed etc. Thankfully by 9 pm I felt slightly better and decided to stay and rest.

I used my high pain threshold to my advantage and endured the pain and passed on any medication offered (I got some pretty confused/weird looks saying no). Why would I refuse? TBI on their own result in extreme gut damage so I didn’t want to cause further damage by adding them to the mix. Plus I would rather be conscious/mindful of the pain to ensure I can truly assess my symptoms and ensure I am not doing anything to aggravate them.  I am not saying you have to say no to drugs if needed, this is just my personal choice as I like to be in tune with what my system is telling me not masking it. If you do choose to take drugs you do need to be careful especially if there is any chance of a brain bleed as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) will increase the bleeding so try your best to stay clear and stick to traditional painkillers eg paracetamol.

I was lucky I didn’t have to leave until the day after the race and my Italian friend broke down and packed my bike for me because there is no way I could even fathom doing that. I spent the rest of my time taking things very slowly which wasn’t too hard as I couldn’t walk after pulling my calf and running a half marathon on it, you could say it was not too happy so walking was very slow with a massive limp. The upside I was thankful to be in paradise, so just chilled and got straight onto my rehabilitation.

Initial treatment

This is the part where I want to share what I did initially to support my TBI and hopefully can help as a resource for others struggling or know someone struggling.

Obviously, on an Island, I had very limited access to support or interventions but luckily I always travel with supplements for optimal health and performance which in this case I was lucky as some of them are also the first line of call for brain health and repair.

Below is a list of the things I implement with dosages and why they were applied, to provide you with a greater understanding. You may note some of these are a little higher than recommended doses so please check with medical professional first. Obviously I had to work with what I had in an isolated location, in the future I will endeavour to provide a detailed protocol of what I would do in an ideal world but for now, here is what I implemented:

Sleep/ Rest:

Why: When it comes to TBI nothing comes close to rest so that became my primary focus. I have an Oura Ring which is one of the leading personal sleep trackers so this was great for me to monitor and assess my sleep. Although sleep is the best thing for a TBI, poor sleep is also often associated in particular REM sleep can be affected. I designed my day around maximise my sleep. Priming the circadian rhythm with early morning

Dose: I aimed for more sleep than normal targeting 9-10hrs. However, I did not always get that

Daily Routines:
Morning:

  • Meditate: to relax the mind
  • Sun Exposure (no sunglasses with as much skin as exposed as possible)
  • Grounding (bare feet),
  • Movement (or should I say limping…)

Day:

  • Napping: As required but no later than 3 pm as I didn’t want to impact my sleep during the night

Evening: Focused on winding down early

  • Early Dinner
  • Blue-blocking Glasses (which were also godsent when over stimulated throughout the day)
  • Meditate: to relax the mind

Meditation:

As mentioned above

Why: Not only is mediation powerful for cultivating a positive perspective but it is great for unloading the exhausted mind. I ensured I had a solid foundation of daily meditation (morning and night) and whenever I overloaded the system and felt symptoms worsening I would take a step back and meditate and straight away fell a release in the pressure within my head.

Dose: 10-20min Morning and night and when needed throughout the day

Exogenous Keytone Salts
Brand: Pruvit

Why: Quite possibly the most important thing I could take early on. Keytones are known to be the most efficient clean fuel for the brain and they can provide up to 70% of the brains energy. Even more importantly a TBI resembles Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as they both present with a reduced ability to utilise glucose for energy. With the reduced capacity to utilise glucose (carbohydrate) for energy, ketones are even more vital in supplying the brain fuel.

Dose: 1 Max Packet per day (half in the morning and the other half in the afternoon)
To increase ketones in the body across the day

DHA (Docosahexaenoic Acid)
Brand: BePure Three

A high strength DHA/EPA Omega 3 Fish oil with Vitamin D and natural vitamins A and E.
Why: DHA is recognized as an essential nutrient for the proper development and function of the brain. In a number of TBI animal trials have shown an improvement in cognitive function, reduction in nerve swelling, stabilisation of cellular energy production and increase nerve repair with the supplementation of DHA & Omega3.

Dose: 2 capsules Morning and Evening

Probiotic
Brand: BePure

Why: Probiotics offer a health benefit to brain function and promote the diversity of gut microbiota.
TBI has shown to greatly impact the gut-brain axis. The communication pathway that has lead to the gut being known as the second brain. TBI results in increased colon permeability, leaving individuals 12 times more likely to die from blood poisoning which is often caused by bacteria, and 2.5 times more likely to die of a digestive system problem, compared with those without such injury. However, a good probiotic can mitigate these effects and help in assisting the healing of the gut.

Dose: 2 capsules Morning and Evening

Antioxidant:
Brand: Viberi Powder

Why: Following a TBI there is a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). It is the ROS which causes the cascading of events and the primary stress to the brain following a TBI. Antioxidants are important early on as they can fight the increase ROS, reducing the load on the brain allowing it to heal.

Dose: 1 sachet/day (However sadly ran out over there so split them over a few days)

Magnesium
Brand: Bepure

Why: Depletion of magnesium is observed in the animal brain and in human blood after TBI. Magnesium is critical in restoring brain plasticity and for improving cognitive function. Researchers showed that with magnesium supplementation they could reverse brain ageing by as much as nine to 14 years. Anything that helps the health of the brain long term can be assumed is helping in the short term acute situation like a TBI. Not only this but magnesium is great in regulating inflammation along with assisting in sleep which can be challenging when suffering from a TBI

Dose: 2 capsules Morning and Evening

Diet: Fasting + Whole Food Antioxidant-Rich Diet

Why: Fasting: Purpose of fasting is to naturally increase levels of ketones in the body, reduce inflammation and along with providing the gut a period to heal and repair following the onslaught of racing and the TBI. However, important to note I was not strict, I did not want to place any unneeded additional stress on my system so when hungry I would eat.

Outside of the fasting, I tried to limit carbohydrates as much as possible and a trend towards a more keto approach. Although this turned out to be challenging to do due to limited food choices over in Asia. Interestingly, I did find myself craving carbohydrates more, I am not sure if this was due to having more than normal or if my body was requiring them so I would listen to the body and not restrict when craving carbohydrates.

Aside from the fasting and minimising carbohydrate where possible I aimed to eat a diverse wholefood rich diet. With a special focus on getting in vibrant colourful foods as vibrant colours are closely associated with nutrients and antioxidant properties. Also in a new country presented a great opportunity to try new foods and develop a bit more of a diverse microbiome.

Does: Length of Fasting is dependant on your ability and adaptation to do so. The key thing to keep in mind is you need to listen to the body. I can happily do 16-18hrs but this is never a target! I just listen to what the body was telling me and adjust accordingly.

Activity:

Walking: Broken and chronically exhausted I couldn’t do much but walk/limp so I took it easy and stayed well within my limits and walked as much as possible and gradually increase easy day.

Why: Movement is phenomenal for recovery as long as you stay within limits as it increases blood flow, Neurotransmitters, (the chemicals in your brain that transmit messages between neurons) and activates neuroplasticity (the brain’s ability to rewire and repair itself after brain injury)

Dose: Every morning and as much as my mind/body would allow throughout the without aggravating symptoms. Gradually increasing each day as my body/mind allowed. For me mornings where best by the afternoon-evening I was exhausted and just rested

Two days post Crash: Bintan to Singapore

 

Then Tuesday rolled around and it was time to leave and catch the ferry back to Singapore and straight to the airport to fly home. Still waiting to hear back from my travel insurance I slowly and painfully got myself to the airport. While waiting to check-in, they finally got back to me and told me to get straight in a taxi to the hospital to be cleared before catching my flight home. At the time, however, this just seemed like too much! I just wanted to get home even as much as I was dreading the flight. However, after talking to my mum, as I was in no state to make a decision she made me realise they were right, you only get one brain and I have worked hard on mine so just not worth the risk. I thought I would only have to stay one night but the insurance company still wouldn’t let me fly so I ended up staying for another 4days in Singapore going back and forth from the hospital for assessments, scans and then for my road rash which became infected. In this time I persisted with my protocol as listed above the best I could.

When it comes to assessment for concussion there is not much they can do in the way of identifying the extent of damage, all an MRI can do is look for a brain bleed which would be a worst-case scenario. Thankfully I was cleared to fly home which by this time I had exhausted my supply of supplements so I was keen to get home to get back on to them to regenerate my brain.

Home:

Finally back home with access to all the resources I need and touched base with a couple of friends of mine a special mention to Cliff Harvey who was really helpful to bounce some ideas and get his thoughts and advice. Especially with a foggy mind, this was extremely helpful as reading literature wasn’t really possible at this time. I then distilled what I knew and what Cliff and others had suggested into a protocol. In my next post, I will discuss what I have implemented in the month or so since coming home.

Keytone Supplments: What is the Fuss about?

Ketone supplements or more technically known as ‘Exogenous Ketones’

Why All the Fuss?

The product has been shown to put you in ketosis in 30mins!

A profound statement when you compare to the time it takes to achieve nutritional ketosis through diet alone which normally takes around 2-3 days and potentially as long as 7 days! It is no wonder people are flocking to exogenous ketones. Plus with all the success stories it does not seem to be disappointing.

What is this magical state ‘Ketosis’?

When in a ketogenic state you produce ketones which simply put is your 4th fuel substrate so fat, protein, carbohydrate, and ketones. This state can be achieved by either restricting carbohydrate or by taking an external supplement such as exogenous ketones, that puts you into to this state and promotes production and use of ketones.

What does Ketosis Achieve?

  1. Weight loss
  2. Increased Energy & Mood
  3. Increased mental clarity & Focus
  4. Increased Performance (Mental & Physical)
  5. Better Sleep
  6. Faster Recovery
  7. Longevity

There are two types of ketones:

  • Endogenous ketones: Endogenous = ‘Endo’ = within. ‘Genous’ = origin.”                                                
  • These are ketones made naturally by the body through the process of ketogenesis.
  • Exogenous ketones:Exogenous = ‘Exo’ = external. ‘Genous’ = origin.”
  • These are ketones supplied to the body by an external source like a nutritional supplement

Application:

No doubt this sounds great but what are people using it for?

  1. Adaptation Phase: Keto Induction

Exogenous ketones are especially helpful for some getting started on a keto or high fat low carbohydrate (HFLC) diet because as you remove carbohydrate from your diet you will face two major challenges ‘Keto flu” and hungry/carbs cravings

  • Keto Flu: Adaptation to a ketogenic diet (keto-induction) can be associated with some unpleasant symptoms, this has been coined as “Keto Flu”. The symptoms associated have been shown to subside after 3-5 days and people report better energy and mental clarity afterward. However,

Exogenous ketones have been shown to be a viable aid in this induction period and avoiding keto flu.

How?

Keto Flu stems from a lack of sodium.  As you deplete your stored carbohydrate (glycogen), you lose 3-4 grams of water for every gram of glycogen (stored carbohydrate). Explaining the initial weight loss associated with ditching carbohydrates. Therefore, in this induction period, it is important to increase sodium (salt) intake to compensate for the loss of water and sodium to aid in retaining water loss. No need to stress, salt intake is not unhealthy like we have been fooled to believe. This is one way that exogenous ketones can help have they are packed full of salt it can aid in minimising this depletion and unpleasant effects associated.

  • Hungry/Carbohydrate Cravings:

The shift from carbohydrate can be difficult as you cut sugar (carbohydrate) it has been shown to reflect a similar addiction response to cocaine. Overcoming any addiction is not easy! The great thing is exogenous ketones can help with this as the increased satiety and remove cravings and instead of being bound to the pantry, hungry at all times, you end up finding that you will need to remind yourself to eat. This liberation from the need of continual refueling was one the most profound effect I personally saw.

 

  1. Weight Loss:

  • Calorie Restriction:

Yes, calories are important and no a calorie is not a calorie.

I personally recommended the approach ‘quality over quantity’, first as it is a more nutrient-dense plus for the purpose it will normally self-correct as you are more satisfied from good quality foods and will naturally limit calorie intake. However, to accomplish  weight loss goals you need to attain a healthy negative calorie balance and being in ketosis is one of the greatest methods in achieving this as mentioned above it curbs your hunger and cravings, liberating you from your need to snack and regularly refuel, resulting in you naturally extending periods between food and eating less at meal times and as a result you reduce your caloric intake which results in weight loss!

  • Lifestyle Buffer: When life gets the best of you, exogenous ketones are also great for keeping yourself on track. They are great for those who struggle with maintaining a strict ketogenic diet and find themselves slipping up, exogenous ketones will aid in buffering the effect of a slip-up, keeping you on track towards your goals.

Application: Take around and during the meal, to buffer response

 

  1. High Performers:

Perfect for any high flyers, always on the move that is either:

  • Time poor
  • Always on the road
  • Up in the air
  • In back to back meetings

Time poor and always traveling with back to back meetings doesn’t leave you much time to eat well, making it extremely hard to come across healthy options.

Dealing with a lot of high flyers, this is a never-ending question that I get asked as they gradually see a decline in their health as they continue down the vicious track. What if I was to tell you the solution is a small sachet that can increase mental clarity, focus, energy, mood while keeping you full till you have time to eat a nutritious meal. Obviously, we want to do our best to eat well but this aid will get you through the tough times, especially the tempting junk food found in conferences! With no insulin spikes and crash, so you won’t crave the slices and sausage rolls.

Especially helpful for those who fly a lot, it is well known how bad airplane food is. It not only tastes bad but because we lose taste buds in the air, they pack it full with sugar and sweeteners to make it palatable….. Instead, I say no to food and come prepared with a sachet of exogenous ketones to sip on and if long hall brings along my own healthy snack like macadamias. Ketones will also help with minimising effects of jet lag as another added bonus.

  • Productivity: Due to the increase in cognitive function and mental clarity, exogenous ketones are my biggest performance hack. Whenever I am under the pump or need to be productive you can guaranty I am sipping on some exogenous ketones.   

 

  1. Sporting Performance:

Performance cannot be forgotten exogenous ketones are like rocket fuel and amazing for all athletes from high intensity to endurance athletes.

The effects on athletes are phenomenal. Using them myself personally in training and racing across a variety of distances from sprint to Ironman Triathlon for the last year and a bit, I can personally attest to this. It is important to understand there is multiple applications to optimise sporting performance.  

  • Fat adapted (Metabolic Flexibility):

The ability to optimise your fuel substrate utilisation and tap into fat for fuel which has an endless supply of energy.  have to be one of the most powerful tools in training fat adaption as within 30mins they put you in a ketogenic state but also they help at keeping the hunger at bay allowing you to extend the fast. They are a great tool to use in the none key steady fasted sessions.

Can you spot my Keto OS Swiss Cacao

Training fasted? Fasted sessions are all about training your bodies ability to tap into your endless supply of fat stores instead of relying on external fueling of carbohydrate like a traditional athlete. You may think I’m crazy but I will often do a lot of my ironman training fasted, a couple hours on the bike followed by a run and then refuel afterward which could be a total of 18hr fast. However, important to remember this is a trained skill and fat adaptation takes approximately 3 months or so to train. I am never hungry or craving food and you shouldn’t be! If you are, eat! You should never suffer if so, you are playing with fire and will burn out due to excessive stress. Additionally, important to understand not all sessions should fasted, fast on steady-state training rather than high-intensity key sessions or longer sessions.

Application: Sip on full sachet across the session.

  • Recovery: The anti-inflammatory benefits of bringing in ketosis is not only beneficial for chronic health conditions but also your recovery from training and racing. Keeping blood sugar levels balanced you no longer get insulin spikes that are associated with an inflammatory response. I see the recovery component being one of the greatest underestimated benefits of exogenous ketones.

Recovery = Adaptation = Results

Drinking Keto OS while in my Recovery Boots in the middle of a big training weekend

Too many athletes neglect the recovery component, and in its place double down on training, putting themselves further in the hole and not allowing the body the time to adapt to training response. What if you could speed this process up and get back training sooner. Exogenous ketones will absolutely aid in a quicker recovery and are something I believe all high training load athletes need to consider. Maybe less important for sports which training frequency is low and have to recover but in sports like triathlon and especially sports like Ironman where you training 15-30hrs per week, most of the time on top of your full-time job, you really need to double down on recovery strategies as you are placing a significant amount of external stressors on your system. This needs to be balanced out!

Sleep is the most powerful component for recovery and exogenous ketones have shown to be effective in improving your sleep and I don’t think I need to explain the benefits of a good night’s sleep we all know the power that poses (For more information on the importance of sleep).

Application: Sip on half sachet before to get the benefits of alternate fuel source while training and racing and sip on the other half post session to promote recovery.

Or

Sip on full sachet post session across the remainder of the day to double down on recovery.

  • Endurance:

Want to go harder and for longer exogenous ketones are the answer! No longer in training do you need to rely on gels and blocks the wreak havoc with your Gastrointestinal (GI) system. Instead, you can fuel your training sessions on exogenous ketones. On most long rides I use ketones for fuel.

Fat Adaptation: Caveat

Although I have been discussing training low void of carbohydrate as much as possible when we race of looking to optimise performance it is a different story! We want to be metabolically flexible and race with the high amounts carbohydrate that our bodies can handle comfortably (Train Low Race High).

Why?

We want to optimise substrate utilisation, once fat adapted we can then utilise carbohydrate on race day/ race prep session (Test before the race!) to buffer our energy stores and give us the high octane fuel for those surges and sprints.

  1. Chronic Disease:

Chronic Health Conditions that might Benefit from Keto:

  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Cancer (glycolytic driven cancers)
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • Epilepsy
  • Metabolic Syndromes
  • Traumatic brain injury (TBI)
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Dementia
  • Parkinson’s Disease (PD)
  • Autism spectrum disorder (ASD)  
  • Migraine headaches
  • Gastrointestinal conditions eg. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
  • Skin conditions eg. acne vulgaris, acne rosacea, eczema, and psoriasis

 

A relatively new area of application and with lives at risk it is an area that obviously requires a lot of research to ensure validity. Not mainstream treatment by any means. However, many people are now well aware of the effects of ketosis on certain conditioning, especially as it has been used as a clinical treatment for epilepsy since 1920. People, as a result, have begun self-supplementing with exogenous ketones to help aid their treatments.

Other Applications

These applications discussed above are only the beginning and as the growing body of literature grows, I believe so to will the number of varying application. I take many performance-enhancing supplements but nothing has compared to Exogenous Keytones so I am excited to watch this field grow.

 

“I Need to Try Exogenous Ketones for Myself!”

Flick us at Taylored a message and we can get you set you up with a trial.

Info@tayloredhealth.co.nz

Subject: Ketone Trial

 

Next Post:

Following on from this post I will take it a step further into the science behind Exogenous Keytones and highlight the differences between the various types to arm you with the knowledge to make the right decision.

Alternate Approach to Fueling the Endurance Athlete

Our last post we discussed carbohydrate (CHO) as a primary fuel source and factors that need to be considered. In this post we want to shed light on an alternative approach to fueling as an endurance athlete and how it stacks up against traditional methods.

With the growing body of literature investigating the current ‘traditional and text book’ endurance based nutrition, I wanted to take sometime to highlight some of the newer evidence along with an alternate strategy. I am not saying this is a strategy for everyone, as in so many areas of our sport (e.g. training and nutrition) there is so much individual variance. However, with my clinical and personal experience if done correctly, I have found an approach that works for the majority of clients and is something I highly suggest you consider and test out, not only from a performance standpoint but for your overall health as well.

 

Background/ Training Nutrition

Before talking about race nutrition (particularly Ironman) you must first understand training nutrition. The science has made some significant developments in recent years and I want to identify what these recent changes are and then compare them to traditional nutritional methods and try help you identify which is the best approach for you!

 

What is Traditional/Textbook Endurance Nutrition?

This nutritional method is based around the intake of CHO and the ability to load (before) and continually replenish CHO stores during exercise.

 

What does this mean?

Challenge Roth 2014

Typically our bodies can only use ~1g of CHO / kg of Body Weight / Hour. We are constantly told that to perform at a high level or merely ‘last the distance’ in any endurance event requires us to be fueled solely by CHO. Go to any endurance event or even give “Ironman Nutrition” a quick google and you will see this is still a common thought. Ironman itself even puts on a pre-race dinner “Pasta Party” based around this concept, with the intention of CHO loading (I pre-ate before attending).

But sport science is a new science so we are always learning and older practices (nutritional or other) are being re-investigated and newer methods are always being developed and tested. In the case of nutrition for ultra events the science is evolving and initially these challenge all my previous beliefs, creating a lot of confusion (even for me, someone who has studied sport science).  But, in taking a step back I was able to analyse from a non-bias standpoint and used a bit of logic to allow me to see the potential of this new nutritional strategy.

 

So, what was being suggested? 

A flipping of the traditional method on it head! Out with the CHO during training and in with the fat! With CHO so ingrained in our culture not only as athletes but also in general day to day life, it can be challenging.

There are plenty of methods that now utilise this approach with some variance within them: High Fat Low Carb (HFLC), Very Low Carb and High Fat (VLCHF), Paleo, Ketogenic, Aktins or Modified Akins. Despite their differences (mainly in their name choice) they all work on a similar premise, that is to reduce CHO used during low- moderate intensity (sparing our very very limited body CHO stores for those rare times when we need to sprint finish) and increasing our efficiency at using fat as a fuel source. Some of the diets listed above are a bit more extreme than others. So which one is best? Again it comes down to you and what suits YOU best.

 

My goal: My focus is always on efficiency and maximising performance both physical and mental. Therefore, I put the high fat strategy to the test against Ironman, with the intention of be able to utilise fat a primary fuel source throughout the race.

 

Fat Adapted Athlete or Metabolically flexible

Put simply you have the ability to use fat as a fuel during exercise and this saves your bodies limited CHO stores (~500-600g even when you eat a lot of CHO in your diet). This shift allows you to move away from a limited and finite fuel source to one that is unlimited!!!!!

At the lower exercise intensities required during an Ironman (we are exercising for 8-17 hours) the increased use of our fat stores may mean less frequent refueling and less reliance on external fueling methods (now no stress now if you drop that one gel out on course). Another added benefit of using your fat stores is enhanced fat loss, great for body composition.

Your health is also improved by shifting to a ‘high good fat’ diet. This is due to the fact that when you use fat as a fuel you do not create the inflammatory response that we see with CHO. Less inflammation is great for supporting a healthy body (Let’s talk Science: High Carbohydrate Vs High Fat)

The ‘traditional’ CHO method would argue that fat use in exercise limits your ability to perform at the top end of your chosen sport (endurance and even anaerobic based power athletes). But the recent research has debunked that argument. Some of the best triathletes would consider themselves to be high fat/ low carb and they are winning events at an amateur and professional level.

 

Put in to practice: Proof is in the pudding

 

Pro Athletes: It is hard to say exactly who is and who isn’t but those to the best of my knowledge are listed below. Along with being pro athletes a lot of them are also coaches themselves as well.

Simon Cochrane: 1st Rotorua & Karapiro Half Ironman, 3rd place IM Japan, 3rd IM Taiwan, 3rd IM Philippines. IM New Zealand PB 8:21

Jan van Berkel: 1st Ironman Switzerland (in record breaking time), 5th 2018 IM Texas (7.48.40); 4th 2018 IM New Zealand

Tim Reed: 1st 2018 IM 70.3 Vietnam, 2nd  2017 IM 70.3 Asia Pacific Championships, Western Sydney, 2nd IM Australia, Port Macquarie

Dougal Allan: 1st 2018 Motatapu Xterra, 1st 2018 Redbull Defiance, 2nd 2017 IM Western, Australia

Kyle Buckingham: 1st 2018 IM  African Championships

 

Coaches / Athletes: Who are renowned for the High fat approach to training

Dan Plews (Coaching Service: Plew & Prof): 1st 2018 Age grouper in IM New Zealand – 8:35

Bevan Mckinnon (Coaching Service: Fitter): 1st 2016 Kona IM in Age group World Championships  

 

This does not mean it will work for everyone!! I just wanted to highlight that this is a strategy being utilised by top athletes, showing that its does not reduce your performance, in fact it may have the opposite effect. These are just some of the top athletes well known for this approach but there are plenty more and it is a strategy that is continually growing in popularity as science proves the validity of this nutritional strategy in performance and health measures.

 

How does a Carbohydrate Athlete match up to a Fat Adapted Athlete

I wanted to keep it simple as I know this topic it can become overwhelming to most. Listed below are a comparison of the two strategies.

Key Things to consider:

Below are some key factors to consider before jumping into this approach and often the biggest mistakes I see athletes make.

 

  • CHO Tolerance: Carbohydrate tolerances or insulin sensitivity (ability to produce adequate insulin when required, to ensure efficient uptake of carbohydrate) will vary from person to person. There is no one size fits all macro breakdown there are just guidelines!

 

  • A-Type Personality: The biggest mistake I see especially in the A-Type personality world of triathlon is athletes going to extreme to quick. Just like physical training this shift in fuel substrate should be a gradual adaptation. I highly suggest easing into it, you should never be suffering (eg starving) if so you are pushing your limits too much! However, if done correctly the benefits to your health, performance and longevity will be profound!

 

  • Female Athlete: Females must also be cautious in adapting this approach as you traditionally require more CHO and must consider the impact of your menstrual cycle and design your intake accordingly. For this reason there doesn’t seem to be too many Pro female Ironman athletes currently, I have heard that Melissa Hauschildt (1st Female 2018 IM Texas – North American Championships) is high fat athlete but that has not been confirmed. I think this is something we will see more as we learn how to better cater the approach to the specific demands female body. As quoted by Stacey Sims: “Women are not small men!”

 

  • Train Low Race High: Once fat adapted, athletes to often approach their racing the same as there training void of or minimal CHO. If you want to optimise your performance you buffer your CHO stores so that you can utilise both CHO and fat substrates to their full potential. Although,  this has been recently shown to be especially important in more competitive and elite athletes than those working at ;lower intensities 

 

Take home message:

No detrimental effect in performance, less need for refueling, fat loss and faster recovery, it sounds pretty good to me!

I will say it again that as with any nutritional approach there is no one size fits all approach, you must find what works for you! Sometimes that means some long term self experimenting. Take it gradually don’t go all out and end up with Keto Flu.

 

References:

Burke, L. M., & Hawley, J. A. (2002). Effects of short-term fat adaptation on metabolism and performance of prolonged exercise. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, (2). https://doi.org/10.1249/01.MSS.0000027690.61338.38

Burke, L. M., Wood, C., Pyne, D. B., Telford, D. R., & Saunders, P. U. (2005). Effect of carbohydrate intake on half-marathon performance of well-trained runners. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 15(6), 573–589.

Campbell, C., Prince, D., Braun, M., Applegate, E., & Casazza, G. A. (2008). Carbohydrate-supplement form and exercise performance. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 18(2), 179–190.

Carey, A. L., Yeo, W. K., Carey, A. L., Burke, L., Spriet, L. L., & Hawley, J. A. (2011). Fat adaptation in well-trained athletes : Effects on cell metabolism REVIEW / SYNTHE Fat adaptation in well-trained athletes : effects on cell metabolism. Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism, (April 2016). https://doi.org/10.1139/H10-089

Cipryan, L., Plews, D. J., Ferretti, A., Maffetone, P. B., & Laursen, P. B. (2018). Effects of a 4-week very low-carbohydrate diet on high-intensity interval training responses. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 17(April), 259–267.

Harvey, C. J. C., Schofield, G. M., & Williden, M. (2018). The use of nutritional supplements to induce ketosis and reduce symptoms associated with keto-induction : a narrative review. PeerJ. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.4488

Havemann, L., West, S. J., Goedecke, J. H., Macdonald, I. A., Gibson, A. S. C., Noakes, T. D., … Fat, E. V. L. (2018). Fat adaptation followed by carbohydrate loading compromises high-intensity sprint performance. Journal of Applied Physiology, 194–202. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00813.2005.

Jentjens, R. L. P. G., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2005). High rates of exogenous carbohydrate oxidation from a mixture of glucose and fructose ingested during prolonged cycling exercise. The British Journal of Nutrition, 93(4), 485–492.

Jeukendrup, A. E., & Wallis, G. A. (2005). Measurement of Substrate Oxidation During Exercise by Means of Gas Exchange Measurements. Int J Sports Med, 26(S 1), S28–S37. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2004-830512

Jeukendrup, A. (2008). Carbohydrate feeding during exercise. European Journal of Sport Science (Vol. 8). https://doi.org/10.1080/17461390801918971

Malatesta, D., Brun, J.-F., Astorino, T. A., Maunder, E., Plews, D. J., & Kilding, A. E. (2018). Contextualising maximal fat oxidation during exercise: determinants and normative values. Frontiers in Physiology, 9(599). https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.00599

Maunder, E., Kilding, A. E., & Plews, D. J. (2018). Substrate Metabolism During Ironman Triathlon: Different Horses on the Same Courses. Sports Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-0938-9

Maunder, E., Plews, D. J., & Kilding, A. E. (2018). Contextualising Maximal Fat Oxidation During Exercise : Determinants and Normative Values. Frontiers in Physiology, 9(May), 1–13. https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.00599

Newman, J. C., & Verdin, E. (2014). Ketone bodies as signaling metabolites. Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism, 25(1), 42–52. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tem.2013.09.002

Oliveira, E. P. De, & Burini, R. C. (2014). Carbohydrate-Dependent, Exercise-Induced Gastrointestinal Distress. Nutrients, 4191–4199. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu6104191

Painelli, V. D. S., Nicastro, H., & Jr, A. H. L. (2010). Carbohydrate mouth rinse : does it improve endurance exercise performance ? Nutrition Journal, 2–5.

Paoli, A., Grimaldi, K., Agostino, D. D., Cenci, L., Moro, T., Bianco, A., & Palma, A. (2012). Ketogenic diet does not affect strength performance in elite artistic gymnasts. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 1–9.

Peters, S. J., Amand, T. A. S. T., Howlett, R. A., Heigenhauser, G. J. F., Spriet, L. L., Ln, O., … Lawrence, L. (1998). Human skeletal muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity increases after a low-carbohydrate diet. The American Physiological Society, (8).

Peters, S. J., Harris, R. A., Wu, P., Pehleman, T. L., Heigenhauser, G. J. F., Spriet, L. L., … Spriet, L. L. (2018). Human skeletal muscle PDH kinase activity and isoform expression during a 3-day high-fat / low-carbohydrate diet. American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism, 1, 1151–1158.

Peters, S. J., & Leblanc, P. J. (2004). Nutrition & Metabolism Metabolic aspects of low carbohydrate diets and exercise. Nutrition & Metabolism 2004, 8, 1–8. https://doi.org/10.1186/1743-7075-1-7

Pfeiffer, B., Stellingwerff, T., Hodgson, A. B., Randell, R., Res, P., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2012). Nutritional Intake and Gastrointestinal Problems during Competitive Endurance Events. Medical Science in Sports and Exercise, (7), 344–351. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e31822dc809

Pfeiffer, B., Stellingwerff, T., Zaltas, E., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2010). CHO oxidation from a CHO gel compared with a drink during exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 42(11), 2038–2045. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181e0efe6

Prado, E., Roberto, D. O., & Burini, C. (2014). Gastrointestinal Complaints During Exercise : Prevalence , Etiology , and Nutritional Recommendations. Sports Medicine, 44, 79–85. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-014-0153-2

Stellingwerff, T., Spriet, L. L., Watt, M. J., Kimber, N. E., Hargreaves, M., Hawley, J. A., … Pdh, D. (2018). Decreased PDH activation and glycogenolysis during exercise following fat adaptation with carbohydrate restoration. American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism, 380–388. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpendo.00268.2005.

Stuempfle, K. J., Hoffman, M. D., & Hew-butler, T. (2013). Association of Gastrointestinal Distress in Ultramarathoners with Race Diet Association of Gastrointestinal Distress in Ultramarathoners with Race. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 2, 103–109.

Volek, J. S., Freidenreich, D. J., Saenz, C., Kunces, L. J., Creighton, B. C., Bartley, J. M., … Phinney, S. D. (2015). Metabolic characteristics of keto-adapted ultra-endurance runners. Metabolism, 65(3), 100–110. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2015.10.028

Volek, J. S., Noakes, T., & Phinney, S. D. (2015). Rethinking fat as a fuel for endurance exercise. European Journal of Sport Science, 15(1), 13–20.

Zinn, C., Wood, M., Williden, M., Chatterton, S., & Maunder, E. (2017). Ketogenic diet benefits body composition and well-being but not performance in a pilot case study of New Zealand endurance athletes. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-017-0180-0

Zügel, D. (2016). Carbohydrate Intake in Form of Gel Is Associated With Increased Gastrointestinal Distress but Not With Performance Differences Compared With Liquid Carbohydrate Ingestion During Simulated Long-Distance Triathlon. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism.

 

Let’s talk Science: High Carbohydrate Vs High Fat

This article is for those that enjoy diving into topics or for someone who likes to have evidence before they make a decision.

What is Science Telling Us?
As with anything in science there are a wide range of beliefs regarding best practice for nutrition. In my last post I presented an overview of the traditional nutritional beliefs and practices (Food Pyramid: We Got It Wrong!). The goal for this post is to update you on the current literature and to pull out relevant pieces of information that will help to educate and guide you towards making a informed decision.

Common Disadvantages Associated Carbohydrate:

What happens when we consume Carbohydrate (CHO)?

As blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that prompts cells to absorb and store the glucose in your system. Insulin is a vital part of our bodies normal functioning and metabolism. But when constantly bombarded with glucose through a regular uptake of high CHO the body is forced to continuously produce insulin, resulting in chronically (long term) elevated levels of hormone.

Next, similar to when your body is exposed to a drug, your body becomes resistant to the normal levels of the hormone and will require increasing amounts of this hormone to carry out the same function. With your cells not effectively responding to insulin you end up with the accumulation of glucose in your blood. This response is known as insulin resistance and is the defining symptom of type II diabetes and can be linked to a whole host of other metabolic conditions.

So can Carbohydrates can be dangerous?

When we talk about CHO we need to acknowledge that there are good and bad CHO sources. Something the oversimplified food pyramid was aware of but neglected to include for simplicity. The bad CHO such as our highly refined & rapidly-absorbed (High Glycemic Index (GI)) CHO (e.g. cereals, white bread etc) are dangerous to your health. These high GI CHO foods cause your blood sugar levels to rise rapidly after eating them and force insulin to peak rapidly and remain within your body. If you eat enough of these types of foods, and regularly eat them as part of your daily diet, then you are almost guaranteed to end up with insulin resistance.

Another downside to this way of eating and elevated levels of insulin is that it creates a pro-inflammatory state that can damage tissues and blood vessels. People who have symptoms of insulin resistance also tend to have high levels of inflammatory markers within their body and blood. Inflammation is a process by which your body’s inflammatory markers and white blood cells work to protect you from foreign substances. High inflammation is seen in people who suffer from diseases such as Cancer, Alzheimers disease, Arthritis and Cardiovascular disease.

In short your diet could be forcing your body into an inflammatory state which is similar to some major diseases today. We could argue that this state of inflammation is the leading cause of chronic health diseases today.

Interesting fact: Cornflakes have a higher glycemic response than raw sugar!! Now that is crazy! Why? Due to being highly refined, they developed the the cereal to be quickly absorbed to fire up the pleasure signals in the brain to get you hooked and wanting more. Food is being manufacture to act like a drug!

Interesting fact #2: Diet/Sugar free soft drinks will produce an insulin response even though they are ‘sugar free’. They produce a response in your body similar to when you ingest CHO drinks. If you are struggling to lose weight or control your weight, try ditching the ‘diet’ soft drink and replacing it with soda water with lime/lemon for a week or two..

So What is Good Carbohydrate?

Quite simply put you are looking for unrefined whole foods that are found in nature (fruits, vegetables, starches etc) .                                                                               

Why? Our bodies have evolved to breakdown utilise these fuels efficiently plus they have not be denatured (loss of nutrients) due processing.

Rule of thumb stay clear or packaged foods and if you do choose a packaged item then select one with minimal ingredients. My rule is no more than 3 or 4 ingredients, and I must be able to pronounce and recognise all the ingredients on the list. Another trick is when in the supermarket, shop around the outside aisles and stay clear of the aisles.  

Take home message: Stay clear of proinflammatory CHO ie refined, high glycemic index. When selecting CHO into your diet choose unrefined whole foods that are found in nature.

Should I consume Carbohydrate?

Yes, although it should be minimised where possible, CHO is important and should not necessarily be completely neglected. What is important is the type of CHO you choose to include in your diet. One of the biggest mistakes I see with people trying to make a change to their diet and health is that they try to completely remove all CHO straight away. Removing a complete food group can be dangerous as you can eliminate a number of key micronutrients essential for health. These micronutrients may be more easily accessible in certain substrates eg CHO over fat. Always aim to have a varied diet to ensure you obtain a variety of micronutrients, as some are limited to certain foods.

Carbohydrate Tolerance (Insulin Sensitivity)

Carbohydrate tolerances or insulin sensitivity (ability to produce adequate insulin when required, to ensure efficient uptake of carbohydrate) will vary from person to person. Therefore, it is important to identify your tolerance. If you possess a high carbohydrate tolerance you should still be careful of what kind of carbohydrates you choose to eat, focusing on high quality sources, not using it as a hall pass to eat whatever you please.

 

Kick Start Your Day the Right Way!

Ditch the cereals that we have been brainwashed to think epitomises a healthy start to your day. These highly refined, insulin spiking foods will quickly derail your day before you even start. Regardless of your carbohydrate tolerance, we should all aim to begin our days with a healthy fat focused breakfast.

Why? Fat does not spike hormones (Insulin) it instead produces a steady release of energy that will keep you satisfied for much longer than CHO.

Two of My Favorite High Fat Breakfasts

 

  • At home: Avocado & Eggs on Spinach

 

A great nutrient dense breakfast and normally my first meal of the day.With loads of added healthy oils such as avocado and coconut oil. Feel free to add meat source like bacon (Yes bacon!) or salmon etc

  1. On the Go: High Fat Smoothie

Mixed Berries, Coconut Cream, Cocoa, Almonds, Spinach, Chia seeds (Add some MCT for bonus fat if you have any). There is endless mixes this is just a base I normally work off.

 

 

Key Takeaway Points:

  1. Carbohydrates are not evil, there are good and bad sources of it like anything.
  2. Not everybody responds the same to carbohydrate some can handle more than others.
  3. Excessive carbohydrate leads to insulin resistance and in turn inflammation which is leading cause of chronic disease today!
  4. Regardless of your carbohydrate tolerance, we should all aim to begin our days with a healthy fat focused breakfast

 

Tricks & Tips for the Holiday Season

The silly season is among us! With the extra time it is the perfect opportunity to take the time to focus on your health and wellbeing.

Lets not sweat the small stuff, indulge a little and relax – you all have earned it! Enjoy.

The holiday period also presents as a great opportunity capitalise on extra free time to develop key positive habits that can help set you up for an awesome 2018. Here is some key tip we suggest you consider.

 

1. Remove Toxins & Stimulants

The holiday season is a great opportunity to clear out all the unneeded toxins and stimulants from your life.

  • Plastic

Reduce your use of plastics as much as possible. The plastic leaches chemicals like pcb’s dioxins which are xeno-estrogenic and mimic estrogen in your body. This creates an estrogen dominance which develops an insulin resistance, making it extremely difficult to regulate and reduce fat.

Remove Plastic:

  • Ditch the plastic drink bottles: Replace with a metal bottle
  • Rethink Tupperware: The last thing you want to do is put hot food into a plastic container (or worse – to reheat it!). Replace with glass or bamboo.
  • Plastic Straws: Replace with metal or bamboo

 

  • Coffee (Caffeine)

Coffee is the greatest source of Polyphenols (Antioxidants) in the western diet! It is also well known that us Kiwis love our coffee per capita consumption ranks among top 20 in the world, according to statistics portal, Statista.com.

Can there be too much of a good thing? If you have become reliant on it and can’t survive a day without it. It is time for a detox! With no deadlines or time constraints with work this is the perfect time for a detox! Remove caffeine from your life for 2 weeks to allow your body to reset.

Removing the stimulant for two weeks is extremely powerful as when reintroduced, you will once again notice the stimulant effects again, that have most likely been stunted due to overuse.

Quick note: If you currently exceed 3 coffees a day I wouldn’t suggest going cold turkey unless you are that way inclined. Gradually cut down!

https://tayloredhealth.co.nz/optimise-your-coffee-break/

  • Blue Light

Light is a nutrient that plays a significant role in signaling your mitochondria (celular powerhouses) to do things and when to do them. Different light frequencies trigger different signals in your cells. Blue light which mostly comes from LED lights places the body under a significant amount of stress.

Newer artificial light bulbs lack many of the sun’s frequencies that our bodies and brains need. Artificial lights, have eliminated most of the infrared, red, and violet light found in natural sunlight, and are amplifying the blue light beyond anything we have evolved to handle. Most LEDs and compact fluorescents emit about 5 times the blue light we’re used to.

Where to start:

Reduce blue light or what is now known as Junk light. Download a bluelight filter app like F.LUX for digital devices (Mobile & laptop) and switch all the lights in your house to halogen and incandescent. They aren’t perfect, but they’re better. Your white LEDs might be saving your power bill but they are sapping your personal energy levels!

 

2. Hydrate

Too often we forget the simple things like hydration. Yet, hydration levels are one of the most important things to regulate.  Water contributes to the maintenance of normal physical functioning, cognitive functioning and thermoregulation. Our body are made up of 60% water, so it is important that you achieve optimal water levels as it is essential for feeling good with optimal health and energy. With 1% of dehydration affects performance by up to 10%!

How much water should I drink?

0.033 litres per kg of body weight, which roughly equates to the following amounts:

  • 60 kg = 2 litres
  • 75 kg = 2.5 litres
  • 90 kg= 3 litres

Hydration Tips:

  • Carry a metal drink bottle with you everywhere.
  • Download Hydration app, to remind you to drink

 

3. Mindfulness

Slow Down: Too often while on holiday I see people stuck in the busy mode unable to slow down. On a mission racing around from place to place and not taking the time to relax and enjoy the present moment. It is easy to get stuck in old patterns but we need to be able to detach ourselves from these habits. I have caught myself in this very situation myself many times. This where it is great to include a mindfulness practice.

Mindfulness Definition: A mental state achieved by focusing one’s awareness on the present moment, while calmly acknowledging and accepting one’s feelings, thoughts, and bodily sensations.

Mindfulness is all about detaching yourself from the past and the future and focusing on the present moment, as it is only the present moment that you can impact. The holiday period presents as a great opportunity to increase or introduce a mindfulness practice.

Where to start?

  • Download an amazing app like Headspace, that will help guide your mindfulness practice. The great thing about Headspace is its flexible nature, that allows you to design a practice around your needs such a length of session and specific focus points.
  • Walk slowly, sounds simple but can be especially tough for busy people to do.
  • Sit down and enjoy scenery eg. beach, park.

https://tayloredhealth.co.nz/just-breathe/

 

4. Look after your Gut!

Our gut is now known as our second brain so it makes sense to look after it! Did you no 90% of your serotonin (feel good hormone) is created in your gut. That means poor gut health can lead to depression.

A great way to start your day is with a lemon juice/apple cider vinegar to help stimulate digestion through stomach acid and bile production.

  • 1 tbsp. Apple Cider Vinegar (it has to be raw, unfiltered, with the mother)
  • Juice from 1 lemon
  • Pinch of Pink Himalayan Salt (antioxidant/electrolyte)
  • 1 Cup of warm water (Make it as a tea)

Aim to drink 30mins prior to breakfast for best results.

Why not throw in some bitter and fermented foods to aid digestive support this summer too.

Popular recommendations include:


 

Bitter:

  • Turmeric, (turmeric lattes)
  • Cacao
  • Ginger
  • Good quality Organic sourced dark chocolate
  • Leafy greens like Spinach and Kale.

 

 

Fermented:

  • Kombucha
  • Kefir
  • Natto
  • Sauerkraut
  • Pickles

 

 

5. Gratitude

The benefits of practicing gratitude are nearly endless. By taking the time to notice and reflect on what you are thankful for, you experience more positive emotions, feel more alive, sleep better, express more compassion and kindness, and even have stronger immune systems.

A great way to cultivate this practice is a Gratitude Journaling. Journaling works as it slowly changes the way we perceive situations by adjusting what we focus on. Shifting our focus away from the negatives and onto the positives. Journaling can be as simple as writing 3 things  you are grateful each day.

6. Fear Setting

With the new year brings new year’s resolutions. University of Scranton research suggests that just 8% of people achieve their New Year’s goals. Let’s not fall into this trap! This year instead of new year’s resolutions replace them with ‘Fear Setting’ (An exercise recently popularized by Tim Ferriss)

Fear setting is all about embracing your fears! A simple process in which you write down and quantify your fears. What is the worst-case scenario? (often it is not as bad as you think). Once identified work back from that scenario, how can you mitigate these the consequences and then how could you recover from this scenario. You will be surprised how powerful this technique can be.

Follow these 3 steps to fear-setting:

Do an 80/20 analysis:

  • “Which 20% of sources are causing 80% of my problems and unhappiness?”
  • “Which 20% of sources are resulting in 80% of my desired outcomes and happiness?”
  • “Which 20% of sources are consuming 80% of my time?”

Write a to-do and not-to-do list:

  • “Why haven’t I done my most important to-do?”
  • “Why haven’t I stopped doing my most important not-to-do?”

Define your fears clearly (Once identified ask yourself this series of questions):

  • What is the worst-case scenario if I did what I’m considering?
  • What are all the things I could do to minimize that from happening?
  • If the worst-case scenario happened, what steps could I take to minimise repair the damage

https://tayloredhealth.co.nz/fear-setting/

 

Wherever you may be this summer, ensure it is a safe and happy one.

Merry Christmas & Happy New Year from the team at Taylored Health & Performance